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Current DJJ Anti-Trafficking Initiatives


Current Initiatives

Victim Identification Tool
Victim Identification Pilot Project – Detention Centers
Enhancing the Continuum of Care
Interagency Collaboration
Florida Human Trafficking Summit


 

Victim Identification Tool

  • DJJ launched a three-county pilot project in August 2012, making Florida the first state in the US to attempt to identify victims immediately upon arrest.
  • In March 2015, DJJ expanded this initiative statewide, putting an improved victim identification tool in all of Florida’s juvenile assessment centers and intake facilities.
  • This Human Trafficking Screening Tool, also used by the Department of Children and Families, screens for both labor and sex trafficking and is utilized with male, female and transgender youth that are at-risk for trafficking victimization.
  • Allows DJJ to serve as a safety net for children not identified by law enforcement. This is important because from July 2009-January 2013, only 3% of suspected victims entered the juvenile justice system on prostitution charges. Most enter on battery or theft charges. 
The pilot incorporated the only research-based, trauma-informed assessment tool in the nation, created by Shared Hope International.

Victim Identification Pilot Project – Detention Centers

  • DJJ conducted this pilot project 2013 in Bay, Duval and Miami-Dade counties.
  • The pilot added questions created by DJJ staff to the detention intake process. All youth were assessed for all forms of human trafficking, regardless of charge. Questions were gender neutral for both the suspect and child victim.
  • When victims were identified, they were referred to an in-house mental health professional, reported to the Florida Abuse Hotline and DJJ’s Central Communications Center.  An alert was entered into DJJ’s Central Communications Center and an alert was entered into our data system to track the child and ensure they received appropriate services.
  • Allows DJJ to serve as a safety net for children not identified by law enforcement. This is important because from July 2009-January 2013, only 3% of suspected victims entered the Florida juvenile justice system on prostitution charges. Most enter on battery or theft charges.

Enhance the Continuum of Care

In March 2014, DJJ and the Department of Children and Families created two working groups to assess the tools available to identify victims of human trafficking and the services available to help them heal. These workgroups provided recommendations to the Departments in 2014 on how to improve victim identification and enhance the continuum of services available to victims in Florida. View the workgroup's recommendations.

Interagency Collaboration

  • Secretary Daly serves on the statutorily-created Statewide Human Trafficking Council, which consists of 15 members who represent state and local organizations. The Council aims to enhance efforts to combat trafficking and support victims. Learn more about the Council.

  • Human trafficking is a problem no agency can solve on its own. DJJ is committed to working with its dozens of partners to identify victims and provide them with the right service at the right time. To this end, DJJ hosts quarterly update calls with over 20 agency partners where participants share their organization’s initiatives and invite collaboration.

Florida Human Trafficking Summit

The Florida Attorney’s General Office, in partnership with DJJ and the Statewide Council on Human Trafficking, will be hosting the fourth annual statewide Human Trafficking Summit on October 29-30, 2015 at the University of South Florida in Tampa. This year's summit will focus on preventing labor and sex trafficking of children and adults. Profession-specific breakout sessions and training opportunities will be available to law enforcement, the legal community, service providers, healthcare professionals, educators, and other first responders. View information about registration, hotel and sessions.



Rev. August 2015


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