Welcome to the new DJJ Website!
Find out how to use the new site.

Director's Corner



Director's monthly message highlighting the department's initiatives.

Women’s History Month began 40 years ago when Women’s History Week grew into a month-long nationwide celebration of the women who shaped our world. The purpose of Women’s History Month is to celebrate the contributions that women have made to the United States and recognize the specific achievements women have made over the course of American history in a variety of fields. This month, as we honor the contributions of the women who came before us, let us take a moment to recognize the women who are making history right before our eyes. 

 


 

 

 

 

 

Sixteen years after interviewing with Major League Baseball for a general-manager position, Kim Ng became the first female GM in American sports history when she landed the top spot with the Miami Marlins.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ayanna Howard is a successful entrepreneur, pioneering roboticist, the head of Georgia Tech’s School of Interactive Computing, and one of Business Insider’s “Most Powerful Women Engineers”. These days she’s working to design a cutting-edge robot that can help children with special needs live healthier, more accessible lives. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Marcella Nunez-Smith an associate professor of internal medicine, public health, and management at Yale, is one of the nation’s foremost experts on disparities in healthcare access. Since the earliest days of the COVID-19 pandemic, she has called attention to the unequal burden borne by communities of color. Dr. Nunez-Smith is now a co-chair of President Biden’s COVID-19 advisory board and will also lead a new White House task force dedicated to health equity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At age 26, Taylor Small became Vermont's first transgender legislator. The focus of Small’s initiatives is for all Americans to easily and affordably access health care.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amanda Gorman drew praise for her spoken-word performance of her poem, “The Hill We Climb” at this year’s inaugural ceremony as the youngest inaugural poet in U.S. History. She is 22 years old and is also an award-winning writer and cum laude graduate of Harvard University, where she studied Sociology. She has written for the New York Times and has three books forthcoming with Penguin Random House.

 



>